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Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

New Mizzou Chancellor's Salary Slightly Higher than Loftin's, Reflecting National Trends

As the University of Missouri’s new chancellor steps into office later this year, he will do so with a larger base salary than his predecessor. When former chancellor R. Bowen Loftin took office in 2013, he was offered a base salary of $450,000 a year before bonuses. Alexander Cartwright, who will be taking over the same position, signed a contract Wednesday to make about 8 percent more, $485,000 a year. In the same time period, the consumer price index, which measures cost of living, has...

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Columbia Public Schools

Columbia Public Schools has found its chief equity officer for the district.

Carla London will be the chief equity officer after serving as the district’s director of student services.

According to Columbia Public Schools, London has also served as the district’s supervisor for student and family advocacy. London also coordinated the Aspiring Scholars program for secondary schools from 2002 to  2006. Before working in the district, London was a middle school teacher in Texas.

Ryan Ferguson
Bridgit Bowden / KBIA

Ryan Ferguson and local officials have reportedly reached a tentative settlement on liability as part of a federal civil suit filed in 2014.

According to court documents, federal judge Nanette Laughrey was notified of the settlement during a telephone conference on May 19.

Ferguson filed the suit after his conviction of the 2001 murder of Columbia Tribune sports editor Kent Heitholt was thrown out.

Terms of the settlement, which does not cover damages, have not been disclosed.

Tailor Institute

A Cape Girardeau institute that helps autistic people will remain open despite losing its state funding.

Officials with the Tailor Institute say they were expecting state funding to arrive July 1, but instead were told the funding has been notified.

The institute works with autistic people to develop skills to become independent, particularly in the workplace.

The Southeast Missourian reports the institute operated on an annual $200,000 state grant.

Director Carrie Tracy says the institute's staff was not given an explanation for the funding cut.

Missouri School of Journalism

  When I told my long-suffering wife I intended to write about Wednesday’s announcement of our university’s new chancellor, she replied with some asperity that she could predict what I would say.

“You’re always optimistic about the new people,” she said, noting that I’ve sometimes had cause to regret those first impressions.

Well, here we go again.

How could I not be optimistic? President Mun Choi, about whom I remain optimistic, was close to giddy as he introduced Alexander Cartwright. The standing-room-only welcoming crowd in the Alumni Center was buoyant. The sun was shining.

In the press conference that followed the opening ceremony, Rudi Keller of the Columbia Daily Tribune seriously asked the question I had posed half-jokingly to Mike Alden earlier as we walked into the building: Why would Dr. Cartwright, or anybody, want the job?..

 

Read the complete column at the Missourian.

Today Paul Pepper and ANGELA SPECK, Professor, Director of Astronomy, MU, break down the science behind the upcoming total solar eclipse! If you have questions, odds are we have answers. In this interview, Angela takes us step by step from "first contact" at 11:45 a.m. through the "total phase" beginning at 1:12 p.m. | May 26, 2017

Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez USDA / Flickr

A preliminary assessment has found about $86 million of damage and costs from recent flooding and storms in Missouri.

The figures provided Thursday by the state Department of Public Safety include almost $58 million of public costs for damage to infrastructure, debris removal and emergency response efforts.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A Missouri Senate committee has advanced a proposal that would allow some companies that use a lot of electricity to negotiate lower rates.

The committee advanced a proposal Thursday after hearing a state Public Service Commission analysis that said average consumers wouldn't see significant rate increases under most scenarios.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

As the University of Missouri’s new chancellor steps into office later this year, he will do so with a larger base salary than his predecessor.

When former chancellor R. Bowen Loftin took office in 2013, he was offered a base salary of $450,000 a year before bonuses. Alexander Cartwright, who will be taking over the same position, signed a contract Wednesday to make about 8 percent more, $485,000 a year. In the same time period, the consumer price index, which measures cost of living, has only gone up about 3 percent.

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