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Intersection - Caleb Rowden Talks Elections and Plans for the Missouri Senate

This week on Intersection, we talk with Caleb Rowden, the newly elected Missouri State Senator for District 19, which is made up of Boone and Cooper Counties. Rowden will replace two-term District 19 Republican Sen. Kurt Schaefer. We talk about Rowden’s tight race again Democrat Stephen Webber, healthcare, the University of Missouri, Planned Parenthood, ethics reform and his goals for the next four years. Listen to the full story here:
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It was in 1974 that William Christenberry found the little red house.

The photographer and painter, a vital chronicler of rural Alabama, came across the building standing alone among the pine trees, deep in the Talladega National Forest. All he had with him was his tiny, no-frills Brownie camera — a long-cherished gift that "Santa brought my sister and me."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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VuHaus Song of the Day

KBIA, NPR Music and VuHaus bring you the latest with new music every day.

Missouri’s two Planned Parenthood affiliates on Wednesday morning sued to overturn the state’s highly restrictive abortion laws, a move expected since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down similar laws in Texas in June. 

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Jefferson City, sets up a showdown over state statutes that were enacted in the wake of the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which held that the right to an abortion in the early stages of pregnancy is rooted in the Constitution.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back local barbershop quartet, the Boone County Hams! They give us a sneak preview of this Saturday's "Harmony for the Holidays" concert at Missouri Theatre, performing "O Come All Ye Faithful" [2:30] and "Mary Had a Baby" [6:23]  - watch! November 30, 2016

Ethanol pump detail
File Photo / KBIA

The Environmental Protection Agency has increased the amount of renewable fuels that must be blended into the nation’s fuel supply next year by nearly 6 percent.

Every year, the EPA adjusts the amount of renewable fuel it requires oil refiners to pump our gas. After initially signaling lower renewable fuel goals, the agency reversed course.

Economist Scott Irwin at the University of Illinois says the EPA’s decision to up the number of gallons in the renewable fuel standard is good news for corn producers—maintaining demand for ethanol creates stability.

A former U.S. Army explosives expert has admitted in federal court that he illegally possessed grenades that authorities say were among a cache of explosives found in his Kansas home.

Forty-two-year-old John Panchalk of Overland Park pleaded guilty Monday in Kansas City, Kansas, to possessing two M-67 fragmentation grenades unregistered to him.

culver-stockton college
Culver-Stockton college

Police say someone pointed a gun at a student on the campus of Culver-Stockton College, prompting officials to place the school on lockdown for two hours until a suspect was detained.

Lewis County Sheriff David Parrish says that at about 8 p.m. Tuesday, authorities received a report of the gun incident on campus. Parrish says no shots were fired and no one was hurt.

Immediately after the report, school officials put the campus on lockdown. The lockdown was lifted about two hours later after a suspect was detained.

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag.

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Striking workers are protesting in Kansas City for a higher minimum wage as part of rallies nationwide.

The Kansas City Star reports that dozens marched around a McDonald's restaurant shortly before 6 a.m. Tuesday before heading to a Burger King restaurant.

The rally participants included the Rev. Donna Simon, of St. Mark Hope and Peace. She says that no one can live on $15,000 a year.

The rallies in Kansas City and elsewhere commemorate the day four years ago that the Fight for $15 movement began in New York City when a group of fast-food workers walked off the job.

Darrell Hoemann/Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting

 

  The farms that straddle both Missouri’s Interstate 70 — which connects the state’s two most populous cities, Kansas City in the west and St. Louis in the east — beckon migrant workers in search of a better quality of life.

 

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